FREE WORLDWIDE SHIPPING

*$99+ / Free Shipping to USA

*$149+ / Free Shipping to Canada

*$199+ / Free Worldwide Shipping

877-750-6455
877-750-6455

MON-THUR 9am - 8pm ET

FRI-SUN 11am - 5pm ET

Tummy Troubles? The Best Essential Oils for Digestive Problems – Episode 95

Audio Player

In this week's episode...

If you’re like most people, you probably don’t give much thought to your digestive system except when you’re experiencing a tummy ache or other issues such as gas, constipation, and diarrhea. In this episode, we’ll delve into ways to keep your digestion humming along including using essential oils for digestion when things aren’t running smoothly.

[MOBILE AD HERE : DO NOT EDIT]

Empowering You Organically – Season 11 – Episode 95

Title: Tummy Troubles? The Best Essential Oils for Digestive Problems

Hosts: Jonathan Hunsaker & TeriAnn Trevenen

Guest: None

Description: If you’re like most people, you probably don’t give much thought to your digestive system except when you’re experiencing a tummy ache or other issues such as gas, constipation, and diarrhea. In this episode, we’ll delve into ways to keep your digestion humming along including using essential oils for digestion when things aren’t running smoothly.

 

* * *

FEATURED PRODUCT

  • USDA ORGANIC
  • 100% pure with no fillers, synthetics or additives and non-GMO
  • Suitable for fragrance diffusers, oil burners, bath water or lotions

Tummy Troubles? The Best Essential Oils for Digestive Problems

If you’re like most people, you probably don’t give much thought to your digestive system except when you’re experiencing a tummy ache or other issues such as gas, constipation, and diarrhea. In this article, we’ll delve into ways to keep your digestion humming along including using essential oils for digestion when things aren’t running smoothly.

Why a Healthy Digestive System Matters

Did you know that not only is your digestive tract important for breaking down food for nourishment, it also plays an important role in immunity, brain health, and cognition!

The Link Between Digestive Health and the Brain

There is an increasing number of scientific studies that have identified a direct link between digestive health and the brain and emotions. Studies consistently show that gut health (or lack thereof) can have an enormous effect on mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, and even autism [1-4].

Hippocrates, known as the Father of Medicine (460-370 BC) believed that all disease processes began in the gut. Although the digestive system is often thought to comprise only the stomach and intestines, it is actually much more inclusive than that. In order to function at optimally, the digestive system requires peak performance from the stomach and intestines, as well as the liver, kidneys, and gallbladder.

7 Ways to Improve Gut Health

There are many steps we can take to better care for our digestion. These include:

  1. eating lots of fresh, organic, fiber-rich fruits and vegetables
  2. focusing on the consumption of nutrient-dense foods
  3. taking probiotics and/or enzymes
  4. reducing stress (which has an enormous impact on the gut)
  5. getting better sleep
  6. exercising
  7. using essential oils

Millions of American Suffer from Gut Issues

When the digestive tract is compromised, it can make you feel over-tired, suffer from lowered immunity, gain weight, and experience gastrointestinal discomfort.

Sometimes you experience stomach pain or cramping, as well as belching, gas, and bad breath. At other times you may feel bloated, nauseous, or have other issues.

In the United States alone, the National Institutes of Health advise that 60 to 70 million people are affected by digestive diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) [5].

The Problem with Over-the-Counter Medications

For years, people have relied upon over-the-counter medications for digestive complaints. These products often contain bismuth subsalicylate, which comes from the aspirin family and has anti-inflammatory, anti-spasmodic, and acid-reducing action.

The potential problem with these sorts of medications is that they are only recommended for use for a couple of days. This means people who have problems that last longer than that (e.g., IBS, chronic heartburn, or acid reflux from GERD) aren’t supposed to use these products for more than two days.

It’s also not advisable for children to take them, nor anyone with the flu, because bismuth subsalicylate is contraindicated on the label for anyone with the flu, a virus, or chickenpox. Taking this medication increases the risk for the development of Reye’s syndrome, a potentially life-threatening illness.

Are Essential Oils for Digestion a Good Alternative?

Certain essential oils and blends can greatly benefit digestive health due to their anti-inflammatory, calming, anti-spasmodic, and cell-protective benefits.

For example, Organixx Digest Essential Oil Blend was specifically designed to provide relief for a wide range of digestive issues. The four oils in Digest Blend work together in a beautiful synergy and all are backed by research indicating their method of action. While we are no longer selling our essential oil blends (including Digest), you may have a bottle on hand!

The next time digestive distress strikes try the ready-made Digest Blend or use any or all of the following four essential oils for digestion and create your own blend. The simplest recipe is just to use equal parts of each or try different ratios and see what works best for you.

4 Key Essential Oils for Digestive Problems

1. Ginger Essential Oil

A 2014 meta-analysis [6] of medical studies investigated the efficacy of ginger for early pregnancy nausea and vomiting. Researchers found that at least four days of taking ginger was associated with a five-fold likelihood of improvement in morning sickness symptoms.

A small 2016 study [7] with post-surgical patients found that inhalation of ginger essential oil significantly decreased nausea and vomiting during the first six hours after inhalation of ginger. Ginger has also been found to be beneficial for travel/motion sickness. A small 1988 double-blind randomized placebo trial [8] found ginger to be helpful for vomiting, nausea, cold sweats, and vertigo for Danish naval cadets not accustomed to sailing on heavy seas.

Another small 2013 clinical trial [9] of 13 volunteers with a history of motion sickness found that pre-treating with ginger reduced nausea, quieted stomach activity, and prolonged the period between attacks of nausea. A 2005 study [10] investigated how ginger actually works on the digestive tract. Researchers found that ginger helped relieve intestinal spasms, and also had direct effect on the parasympathetic nervous system, which is active during the digestive process. They found that ginger assisted with hyperactive states of the gut as is found with diarrhea and colic.

A 2015 animal study [11] found that ginger essential oil inhibited the formation of gastric ulcers by 85%. Ginger also increased antioxidant enzymes and reduced the erosion, hemorrhaging, and necrosis (untimely cell death) of cells of the stomach wall, thus providing a protective effect. Ginger may also be beneficial in cases of ulcerative colitis, a painful inflammatory condition that can cause rectal bleeding, bloody diarrhea, and abdominal cramping.

A 2018 animal study [12] found that 6-gingerol, an ingredient in ginger, increased important antioxidants and inhibited the inflammatory pathways that contribute to this disease.

2. Peppermint Essential Oil

Peppermint (Mentha piperita) is well known for the assistance it can provide for our tummies. If you have over-indulged in your favorite food, are feeling nauseous with a virus, or suffer with more chronic problems of the digestive tract, peppermint can be incredibly soothing.

It is a beautifully cooling aromatic oil that is also:
• anti-inflammatory
• anti-spasmodic
• analgesic (pain relieving)

There are many studies that reflect the benefits of peppermint oil for the digestive system. For instance, a 2007 study [13] found a 50% reduction in the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in 75% of patients who tried peppermint oil for their symptoms.

Indeed, a 2019 review [14] of a dozen randomized trials including over 800 patients using peppermint oil for IBS symptoms found that peppermint oil was safe and effective.

2013 research [15] found that both peppermint and spearmint reduced the intensity and frequency of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

An older 2008 study [16] investigated the use of peppermint for dyspepsia (pain or discomfort in the upper abdomen, also known as indigestion). Researchers found that peppermint oil was safe and effective for dyspepsia, and also for reducing the abdominal pain, flatulence, and diarrhea for those with IBS.

Studies have found that peppermint oil is good for children, too. In a 2014 review [17] of 14 clinical trials involving nearly 2,000 children, peppermint oil was found to reduce the frequency, duration, and severity of abdominal pain. [Caution: only use essential oil with children under the direct supervision of a qualified practitioner.]

3. Lemon Essential Oil

Lemon (Citrus limon) has an uplifting fresh citrus aroma. Lemons have a long history of use by traditional Ayurvedic doctors as an aid for many ailments, including digestion. Modern research is starting to catch up, and it shows that lemon oil relieves nausea and vomiting and is:
• anti-inflammatory
• antimicrobial
• anti-parasitic
• anti-fungal

A 2014 clinical trial [18] found that inhaling lemon oil significantly relieved nausea and vomiting in 100 pregnant women. A 2020 study [19] investigated the phytochemicals in lemons with regard to their potential therapeutic benefits.

Researchers found that lemons had anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anti-parasitic, and anti-cancer benefits. All of these properties combined have benefits for overall digestive health.

A difficult-to-eradicate yeast known as Candida albicans can cause major trouble for the digestive tract. When C. albicans invades the digestive tract, it can cause oral thrush (a burning sensation in the gut after eating certain foods), recurring genital and urinary tract infections, even ulcerative colitis, and Crohn’s disease.

Candida overgrowth is especially rampant among immunocompromised people, the elderly, those on broad-spectrum antibiotics, overstressed people with a high intake of sugar, carbs, and alcohol, and individuals hospitalized in intensive care units.

A 2019 study [20] found that lemon oil (among other essential oils tested) had strong anti-Candida activity against several lines of Candida species.

4. Fennel Essential Oil

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) has a long history of use as a medicine and especially for digestive difficulties. Studies [14] indicate fennel is:

  • antioxidative
    • anti-inflammatory
    • anti-ulcer
    • anti-viral
    • anti-spasmodic
    • antimicrobial
    • DNA protective
    • has blood-sugar-lowering and cholesterol-lowering properties

A 2018 animal study [22] found that administering fennel oil significantly improved antioxidative status, reduced inflammation, and reduced blood sugar levels in rats with dyslipidemia (an abnormal amount of fats such as triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood).

A 2011 study [23] investigated the effects of the phytochemicals in fennel on rats with gastric ulcers. Researchers found fennel to have significant anti-ulcer activity and may help to prevent ulcers.

3 Ways to Use Digest Essential Oil Blend for Digestive Problems

#1. Apply a few drops of Organixx Digest blend across the abdomen and/or low backmassaging it in gently but thoroughly. To improve absorption, place a warm compress across the belly and/or low back after applying Digest. Dilute first with an organic carrier oil such as almond, coconut, hemp, or avocado oil. Try using 3-5 drops of Digest per teaspoon of carrier oil.

#2. Place a couple drops of Digest blend into your palms, rub them together, and tent hands over your nose and mouth, being cautious to avoid eyes. Breathe the oils in deeply for a few moments, holding the essential oil vapor in your lungs for 5-10 seconds (or for as long as you can). This helps get the essential oils into your lungs and bloodstream and working quickly to relieve digestive difficulties.

#3. If you are suffering from nausea or motion sickness, using Digest blend on an acupressure point known as “Heavenly Appearance” (aka SI 17) can be quite beneficial. To locate this acupressure point, place a fingertip on the outside of the face, just below the earlobe in the indentation between the earlobe and the upper tip of the jawbone (on both sides of the face). Place a drop or two of Digest on your fingertips and gently massage this point. It can be tender, so go gently.

Considerations When Using Essential Oils for Digestive Problems

While the four essential oils in Organixx Digest Blend are all derived from plants that are also foods/spices, essential oils are highly concentrated and should only be ingested under the guidance of a qualified healthcare provider. For any persistent pain or digestive difficulties, be sure to consult your doctor.

Essential oils should not be used as replacements for medicine but to support overall health.

Never apply essential oils anywhere near eyes, the inside of the ears, or to other sensitive regions of the body. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding and children should always seek their doctor’s advice prior to using essential oils.

Be aware that essential oil products vary greatly between makers in purity, strength, and quality. Only purchase pure, organic essential oils from companies you trust.

 

***

 

Subscribe to Empowering You Organically 

Never miss an episode! 

APPLE PODCASTS                 SPOTIFY                 GOOGLE PODCASTS

Subscribe to Empowering You Organically 

Never miss an episode! 

APPLE PODCASTS                 SPOTIFY                 GOOGLE PODCASTS

 

***

 

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Welcome everyone to another episode of Empowering You Organically. I’m your host, Jonathan Hunsaker, joined by my cohost Ms. TeriAnn Trevenen.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Hey everyone.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And, TeriAnn just said before we started recording, she was like, “We’re going to talk about poop in this episode.” We’re going to talk a lot more than just poop. All right? So we’re talking a lot about our digestive systems and we’re going to talk about the health of our digestive systems. And we’re also going to talk about some essential oils that will help ease our digestive issues as well. And it’s really interesting because there’s an increasing number of scientific studies that have identified a direct link between digestive health and brain and emotions. And so your gut health or lack thereof can have a massive impact on your mental health and really your emotional health as well. And so this is something that is finally coming to the forefront, that more and more people are paying attention to. But I still don’t think they’re paying enough attention to it.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

There’s so many things I could say on this. I think people around the world don’t think about their gut or their digestive health until they have a stomach issue, whether it’s gas, constipation, diarrhea, whatever it may be when it comes to your digestive track. But gut health is something that’s being more widely accepted. Not only in natural medicine, but also in conventional medicine, as well as something that we really have to look at when it comes to our health. One of the big buzzwords running around right now, that people call it a buzzword because nobody really knows, is leaky gut. I’m just going to go out on a limb here and say that I’m a full blown believer in leaky gut and that it’s a true thing that can happen to people when your gut is not healthy, your digestive system is not healthy. And even for those of us who don’t think about our digestive system or our gut health, unless we’re having an issue, are you paying attention to things that would signal to you that you don’t have a healthy gut and digestive system?

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Maybe you have gas or constipation or diarrhea or you feel bloated and you know something’s wrong. But, even if you’re not having those specific issues and you’re not, we said, we’re going to talk about poop, you’re not pooping regularly. And what does your poop look like? I mean, there are actual articles and people out there talking about what it should look like when the poop is being passed out of your body and how that looks and how often, like this should be happening every day. I mean, if you’re not pooping every single day and getting that waste product out of your body, that’s a huge sign that there’s something wrong with your gut and your digestive tract. So not only is it just like a major red flag, like my stomach hurts really bad or I’m bloated, or I ate too much food and you can feel that, but there are other things that can go on, even when things may seem okay, that can tell you something’s wrong with my gut.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And I think what’s really interesting here is you’re not going to know that your gut is necessarily out of whack because you have a sore stomach or because you have constipation or diarrhea. Your gut health may be affecting your cognition or your immune system, your brain health. I mean, there’s all sorts of these different things that can show up where you think, “Well, maybe I’m not getting enough sleep is why my brain is foggy.” But he could have everything to do with your diet and your digestion. And we don’t think about that as much.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Because it’s not seen.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

It’s not seen and it’s not in that exact area, right? Sometimes it’s like, “Oh, I got a headache.” But you don’t realize it’s because of the knot that’s halfway down your shoulder blades is why you have the headache. So you may not need to take an ibuprofen. What you may need to do is work that knot out of your back because that what’s causing the pain up there. I think we often get misguided in where the pain is, that that’s where the issue is as well. Right? So I think this is going to be a awesome podcast. I think there’s a lot here to really learn and let’s just dive directly into it.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Yeah. I want to say one other thing too. I had an experienced one time at an event where I was at, where there was a massage therapist. And this was the first time I had already been learning about gut health in ways I never had before, but she shared with me, I was actually getting a foot massage from her and we were just talking about so many things and having a good conversation. And we got onto the topic of why she got into massage and how she got there. And she started talking to me about some of her unique experiences and helping really heal people through massage. One of the things that she told me is that when they were training in massage, one of the things that they’re trained on is that when you’re massaging a person and they’re laying backside down, you never can massage a person’s stomach without permission.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

That’s how she was trained. Now, of course, if you’ve had massages regularly in your life, you know your massage therapist is not going to do things that you don’t ask for, like when it comes to like massaging the stomach. Or if you have pain in an area of your body, you let them know you communicate with them. But I said, “So why is that? Why is that such a big thing that you were trained on?” And she said, “What a lot of people don’t realize is how much of your mental and emotional health is tied to your gut.” And we may need to do a podcast and talk more about this because it’s actually really fascinating for me as well. But as Jonathan mentioned earlier on, our gut is not just about overall health, gut health, digestive health, but I remember her telling me that and thinking, “No way, like no way.” I’d been learning about the gut, but I never heard it in this context.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

And sure enough, as I read more about it, learned more about it. Your gut is a powerhouse for your overall health, but also your mental and emotional health. And having healthy gut has long lasting, far reaching impact of your overall health. We said this so many times on the podcast, and it’s a huge part of keeping yourself healthy throughout your life, even when it comes to emotions and mental health. So like she said to me, you can’t massage someone on their stomach without permission because all of their trauma, all of their emotions, all the things they’ve experienced in their life. If you think about it, we feel so much in our gut. We hold so much, as far as our emotions go, in our gut and it lives in there. And so it’s a respect thing and it’s a connecting with someone thing when a massage therapist does that and asking that permission.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Absolutely. And I think we could go down a rabbit hole when you talk about what’s your gut feeling, what’s your gut instinct, all of that kind of stuff. And the other thing to keep in mind is I think when we talk about gut health, oftentimes we just think, “Okay, it’s just the stomach and just the intestines,” when really, it goes much beyond that. We need to take into consideration our liver, our kidneys, our gallbladder, and really even our colon, right? So the colon is not as much considered the gut, but keeping that clean and healthy as well. There can be a lot of disease that starts in the colon and a lot of disease that’s considered to start in the gut as well. So let’s talk about seven ways to improve gut health.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Sure. So our first one is eating lots of fresh, organic fiber rich fruits and vegetables. I think this is one we’ve all heard something we all know we need to be doing. Second is focusing on the consumption of nutrient dense foods, which is also important foods that really have a lot of nutritional value and really have heavy weight behind keeping our gut healthy.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And I’m going to jump in on that because, and we’ve talked about this on other podcasts, and this is a challenge with processed foods. This is really the challenge with fast foods. You can go and eat a McDonald’s Big Mac meal and you’ll get 1600 calories, probably. I’m just making it up so don’t quote me. But between the burger, the fries and the soda, you’re at 1200, 1600 calories. And even though you’ve eaten a lot of food and a lot of calories, in an hour or two later, you’re craving something else. Now you might be craving sugar, or you might be craving something else. But really what your body is craving is nutrients. And it’s a nutrient deficient meal.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And that can show up sometimes in wanting something sweet. That can show up sometimes as wanting something salty. It’s really just your body saying like, feed me something else because I want the nutrients. And it’s a big pitfall that we fall into because calories is what puts the weight on, right? And if two hours, an hour, after eating McDonald’s or anything where you’re getting 1500 calories, you’re hungry again, then you’re just consuming calories on calories on calories and we end up getting bigger. Or, you stay full, but your body’s not getting the nutrients it needs. You’re taking a good multivitamin. And now all sorts of other diseases and diseases show up.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Yep. Absolutely. Number three, taking probiotics. And I’m going to add to that as well, this is my own little addition, enzymes. So Jonathan did a great podcast with our friend Wade, talking about enzymes, where we learned so much about enzymes that we didn’t know or that you may not have known. But, what a lot of people don’t think about when it comes to food is a lot of the food that we ingest, in this day and age with our nutrition, sits in our gut and rots and it just sits there and our body has a hard time breaking it down. We don’t have enough enzymes. It’s not healthy food we’re putting into our body. So both on the probiotics and the enzyme side, there are so many benefits to making sure that’s a part of your supplementation.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And I’m going to add that prebiotics could almost be more important than probiotics. I would also add the enzymes are probably more important than probiotics too. I think probiotics are good. I think the jury is still out though. And how much of those actually make it through and do we get to use. And we make one day studies show that it absolutely does help. Unfortunately, there’s a lot of probiotics out there that I don’t think are getting the benefits that people want. And that’s why I think prebiotics and prebiotic and probiotic foods. Right? So fermented foods, sauerkraut, kimchi.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

I love kimchi.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Yeah, kimchi’s great, the kombuchas. Different things like that can help in your diet. What you talked about with the enzymes, I think enzymes are overlooked all the time in your gut health.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Yeah. I mean, we don’t ferment foods the way that we used to, for our different foods that we’re ingesting into our body. Like kimchi, all those things you’re saying, I’ve been putting kimchi on tacos lately, like shredded kimchi, and it’s so yummy. There’s so many awesome ways that you can incorporate things like that into your nutrition plan and really support your gut health.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Well, we used to fermented foods so that it would last longer and since the invention of the ice box and then soon the refrigerator.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

And preservatives.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And preservatives. I mean, we don’t can the way that we used to, we don’t ferment the way that we used to. And then processing foods or cooking the foods and heating them up. Right? Also once you heat a food over, I think it’s 112 degrees, 114 degrees, it starts destroying the enzymes that are in there. And so without those enzymes, your body only has a certain amount of enzymes that you’re born with. And once that bank runs out, it runs out and you’re done. And some enzymes run out quicker than others. That’s why some end up being lactose intolerant and all of that other stuff. So really highly encourage people to get on a strong enzyme routine to help heal their gut.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Yep. Number four, reducing stress, which has an enormous impact on the gut. I’m living proof of this. I’ve had some very high stress moments in my life and it really impacts my overall health. And I’m someone that likes to be a high performer and go all the time and I like to have a lot going on, but it impacts my health from a gut perspective. There’s no doubt. And so reducing that stress and finding ways to really step back and take a breath, this is a huge balancing act. I’m sure people are there like nodding their heads. And sometimes it can be hard to admit like, yeah, we have a lot of stress in our lives. But you really have to find ways to balance that and pull back. And we live in a society where it’s stress seems to be the badge of honor and the badge of success.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

But again, when we talk about emotions and mental health, your gut, think about how your stomach feels like when you actually sit down for the day and you’ve been going, going, going all day and you’re like, “Okay, let me just fill my body.” I know for myself, there’s a few places that I feel it. I haven’t had good breathing practice all day. I’m taking my breaths, but also I can feel like that tightness in my chest, in my gut, in my back. I’ve just been holding it all in all day because I’m just going, going, going. Stress is a huge factor when it comes to your gut health.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Number five, getting better sleep. Getting better sleep. We have done podcasts on sleep. You cannot make up for the sleep that you lose. This is one place just a few years ago, and I’ve done my podcast on my health issues and my health journey, where I changed and updated my own regimen and what I was doing with sleep and having better sleep hygiene. I’m still not perfect at it, but I get far more sleep than I used to.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

And I can absolutely tell you, you cannot make that for the sleep that you miss. It helps to restore your brain, it helps restore your body, it helps with gut health overall and helping your body to regulate all these things it needs to do. It can’t do them when you’re not sleeping. It has to do some of these things when you’re sleeping. So getting better sleep. I don’t think that we can stress this enough. When we did the podcast with all the research around sleep, I was blown away. I was absolutely blown away by the stats on sleep and blown away by just how much sleep is needed for every different aspect of our body.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Absolutely. And by the way, we’ve done podcasts on most of these things. So we’ve done podcasts around, I think, probiotics and enzymes. We’ve done podcasts around reducing stress. We’ve done podcasts on getting better sleep. So go to, quick plug, empoweringyouorganically.com to check out, I think we’re at 80 episodes now, quite a few episodes. So you can skim through there and for just about anything health related, you may find it in there.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

The sixth one is exercise. We’ve done a podcast all on exercise. It really is interesting how much exercise can affect your gut. And if you’ve ever had trouble going or it felt a little constipated or backed up, just the act of walking and the way that that moves your intestines and massages things out can help get things flowing. So I mean, exercise, it helps reduce stress, it helps you sleep better and in turn will help heal the gut as well. The last one is using essential oils. Essential oils have been around for a long, long time and I love when they start coming back into the mainstream. Again, we use essential oils in our house all the time. Probably not even as much as we could, but essential oils are another very effective way to heal your guide and get certain outcomes.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Yeah, absolutely. I think that they’re one of these underestimated things. I will just put a quick plug in there for essential oils that you really need a good quality, really need to look at different specifications when it comes to essential oils. We’ll actually plug in the notes and podcasts, where we talk about things to look at when you’re purchasing essential oils. There’s different specifications. We’re not going to talk about it today, but there’s different specifications and requirements you should be looking at when you’re purchasing your essential oils. It’s just like buying a multivitamin that is just full of garbage and fillers and other things and just going straight through your body. Spending a lot of money on essential oils that don’t really work and don’t live up to some of these standards that we outlined in the podcast that we’ll link in the show notes, you’re just wasting your money is really what.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And I’ll give you, I mean, for those that don’t want to take the time to go listen. Make sure your essential oils pass the triple purity test. That is that they are USDA certified organic. I know that that upsets a lot of people in essential oil space because they don’t like to spend the money on getting their products certified, USDA organic. But that’s the only way to guarantee that you’re getting a pure, clean oil. Second, making sure that it’s from a non-GMO plant. And then third, that the only ingredient is that oil, that there is no other filler. There is nothing else in there. That is the triple purity test. If it doesn’t pass all three of those, then you should pass on buying that essential oil and find a different one.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Absolutely. So we’re actually going to talk a little bit about some really good quality essential oils for gut health. But before we do that, I want to just give some numbers and some information on just going a little further on gut health and gut issues. So over 70 million people are affected by digestive diseases in the United States alone, such as irritable bowel syndrome and other digestive and gut issues. Also, when your digestive tract or gut is compromised, it can make you feel over tired. You can suffer from lowered immunity, which we have said many times that the gut is like the powerhouse for your immune system. And so you can see yourself getting sick a lot more and having a lot more issues with trying to stay well and healthy, especially during seasons and times where disease is running more rampant, like the flu for example, gaining weight and experiencing gastrointestinal discomfort.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

There are over-the-counter solutions, by the way. A lot of things that are in the aspirin family. But the potential problem with these kinds of medications is that they’re only recommended for use for a couple of days and they’re not a longterm solution or fix. And obviously they can have a negative impact if you use them as a longterm fix to these issues. And you can develop some side effects and life-threatening illnesses if you stay on these medications longterm. So, best solution is to take some of those tips we talked about and really try to shore up your gut health. But, here are a few of those essential oils we were talking about that you can use for your gut health. The first one is, you want to tell them?

Jonathan Hunsaker:

It is ginger essential oil. So we actually put an the article out. It’s one of our most popular articles on organixx.com, that talks about ginger essential oils. And unfortunately, we actually don’t carry a ginger essential oil at Organixx. We may in the future, due to all the emails and support tickets that we get. We currently don’t carry a ginger one. But I mean, ginger has just been known to help the digestion across the board. So whether you’re making your juices, if you ever look at things like for your kids when they’re having stomach issues or different things like that, you’re always going to find ginger in there. And so ginger, I think is just a phenomenal root and can really help in a lot of things when it comes to your gut health.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Yeah, and ginger is really, really powerful if you’re having issues with nausea, if you’re having issues with vomiting. Ginger is one of those things that can really soothe some of those symptoms. It’s very, very, very soothing. Also, the other thing about ginger is that it can be beneficial in cases of ulcerative colitis, which is a painful inflammatory condition that can cause rectal bleeding, bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramping. This is a very serious issue. But studies have proven that the use of this oil can actually help you to combat that. So a really powerful, essential oil when it comes to digestive issues.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

The second one is peppermint essential oil, and it’s well known for the assistance that can provide with our stomachs. If you have overindulged in your favorite food, you’re feeling nauseous with a virus or suffer with more chronic problems of the digestive tract, peppermint can also be something that’s very, very soothing. It’s also anti-inflammatory, and as we know, inflammation issues, which can also occur in the gut and the digestive tract can lead to longterm illness and sickness. So peppermint’s one of those things that can be helpful when it comes to inflammation.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And I love peppermint. I mean, you ever wonder why you have an after dinner mint? Why it’s a peppermint? Why they give it to you at restaurants? That is why. Because it really helps with the digestion, it really helps ease the body, ease the gut health after your meal.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Absolutely. Number three, lemon essential oil, which is one of my very favorites. It has an uplifting fresh citrus aroma. It’s been used for thousands and thousands of years for many ailments, including digestion. Modern research is starting to catch up and it shows that lemon oil relieves nausea and vomiting, just like the peppermint and the ginger. It’s also anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anti-parasitic and antifungal.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

You’ll also hear about lemon essential oil, just on a side note for cleaning properties, and you can use it in your sprays for your counters. And it’s really great for showers, bathtubs, bathrooms, if you don’t want to use those toxic cleaners. Lemon essential oils also great for that as well. Another one of these amazing things from nature that like, here we’re talking about it helping and healing your gut, but you can also use it to clean your house, which I think is just such a beautiful thing about the things that we find in nature. Also, just on a side note, lemon is very, very, very, very strong when it comes to anticancer benefits. And so one of those things that can really be a powerhouse when it comes to that.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Absolutely. Also those that suffer with candida overgrowth, the lemon essential oil can really help with those that have immunocompromised systems. And so people that are overstressed, have an intake of sugar and carbs and alcohol, different things like that, that have the high candida, lemon essential oils is phenomenal.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

And people who have been on antibiotics too. I mean, we could go down an entire rabbit hole on antibiotics and gut health. And I think there’s a place and a time for antibiotics, but I also think you have to be really careful.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Yeah. I mean, listen, we live longer as a species, right? We have a longer life expectancy because of antibiotics and they definitely have their place. I think there is a little bit of a challenge of them being overprescribed. I remember taking my daughter into a pediatrician because her foot was sore on the bottom and I think there was a splinter that really got wedged in there. And the pediatrician was like, “Well, we should put her on antibiotics just in case.” And I’m thinking, “I’m never coming back to you again.” Right? Because listen, why are we going to stick somebody on antibiotics if it’s going to wipe out?

Jonathan Hunsaker:

I mean, it’s like a nuclear bomb to your gut and it gets rid of everything. Yes, it can get rid of that bad stuff that’s causing issues, that has you ill and those bacterial infections and things like that. So yes, they’re good in that context. But only use it when you really need to. And then once you do, it’s time to refeed the gut. So you want to have a lot of foods that are high in fiber. You want to get your probiotics, get your prebiotics, rebuild that gut health with the good bacteria. And yeah, I mean, I think antibiotics are a little over prescribed. They absolutely are necessary in a lot of cases. And you just have to make sure that you rebuild your gut afterwards.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Absolutely. Fourth and final essential oil is fennel essential oil. It has a long history of use as medicine, especially for digestive difficulties. Again, this is another antioxidative essential oil, anti-inflammatory, anti-ulcer antiviral, antimicrobial, antispasmodic, DNA protective. I mean, this thing is a powerful, essential oil. Also, bonus benefits, blood sugar lowering and cholesterol lowering properties as well. There’s a lot of studies that tell us that improves antioxidative status, reduced inflammation and reduced blood sugar levels. And they’ve seen this and it’s been proven in research. But also again, just that benefit when it comes to our gut health and our digestive health. It’s a really powerful essential oil.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Absolutely. So listen, I mean, you have a lot of tools at hand right now and we actually have even more show notes we don’t have time to get into. So go to empoweringyouorganically.com. Check out all of our show notes. We talk about even more essential oil blends that you can use, how to use some of those essential oil blends. And I just kind of want to end the show with how important it is to pay attention to your gut health and how it can change your entire body. It can change your energy levels, it can change how strong your immune system is, how often you’re getting sick. It can change your mental clarity. It can really make a big difference. I think it’s often very much overlooked. We kind of pinpoint the different areas that we feel like we’re having issues when a lot of it really can stem back to the gut. Heal the gut first and then see what is still out there lingering.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Absolutely. I want to say one last thing really quickly too, about essential oils, especially when you’re facing some very serious health issues. You can always diffuse essential oils, right? That’s a given, it’s easy. And the other thing that you should really be educated on and talk with your functional medicine doctor about or refer to a well-written and well-researched book, is how to use your essential oils. So when we talk about using these essential oils, fennel, lemon, peppermint, ginger, you can do more than just diffuse a lot of essential oils. You can use them topically, but you should dilute them. Sometimes they can be ingested. Now we’re not doctors. We’re not here to tell you how to use them. What I’m telling you is, is get a well-written book by a functional medicine doctor, see a functional medicine doctor or holistic practitioner who can help you use the essential oils in ways.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

And they can be used in a variety of ways that could help benefit you and your health. But know what you’re doing because as all things can go, there’s the good side and the bad side to everything. These can be powerful in helping you with your health, but knowing how to use them correctly is really the magic when it comes to essential oils.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And don’t be scared of essential oils. I think oftentimes there’s so many essential oils it can be overwhelming, there’s “Well, can I ingest it? Can I not do this? Can I do that?” I mean, most of this stuff can be found online pretty easily. I know that we have a report for like the 60 ways to use the top 12 essential oils. So they’re not as scary as you think. And as with anything, start small and try it out and see how your body feels, see how your body reacts. I think you will be pleasantly surprised in how effective essential oils can really be. There’s nothing magical about them or mystical about them and nothing woo-woo about them. They’ve been around for a long time. They really do work when you use them and you have to listen to your body.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Yeah. I just tell people it’s a different way. We talk about plants and herbs and other things, natural foods that are grown from the earth. I mean, this is just a different form of those. And so concentrated, really powerful, and a lot of people do talk about, “This is voodoo. These can help you.” Yeah. They are derived from natural things that come from the earth. They absolutely can, you just have to know how to use them in the right way.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Yeah. I mean, if you sprinkle a little bit on a broken leg, it’s probably not going to help much. But for the right symptoms and for the right ailments, essential oils are phenomenal.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Yep.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Thank you everybody for tuning in. Go to empoweringyouorganically.com for all of the show notes. You can watch this video again, you can download the audio. Subscribe to us on iTunes and give us as much of a rating as you want to give us, leave us your feedback. Let us know if you like what we’re doing, or if you don’t like what we’re doing. And thank you for tuning in, we will see you on the next show.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Thanks everyone.

 

***

 

Subscribe to Empowering You Organically 

Never miss an episode! 

APPLE PODCASTS                 SPOTIFY                 GOOGLE PODCASTS

 

Organixx’s Daily Detoxx

Organixx’s USDA Certified Organic Essential Oils

EPISODE: Enzymes 101: The Micro Miracles You're Missing

EPISODE: Enzymes 201: P3E The NEW Powerful Proteolytic Enzyme

EPISODE: TeriAnn’s Health Journey

EPISODE: Top Essential Oils Do’s and Don’ts

16 Uses & Benefits for Ginger Essential Oil (+ Application Tips)

[1] Can Microbiology Affect Psychiatry? A Link Between Gut Microbiota and Psychiatric Disorders.

[2] Melancholic Microbes: a Link Between Gut Microbiota and Depression?

[3] Meta-analysis of Alcohol Induced Gut Dysbiosis and the Resulting Behavioral Impact

[4] The Possible Role of the Microbiota-Gut-Brain-Axis in Autism Spectrum Disorder

[5] Digestive Diseases Statistics for the United States

[6] Effects of Ginger for Nausea and Vomiting in Early Pregnancy: a Meta-analysis

[7] Effectiveness of Ginger Essential Oil on Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Abdominal Surgery Patients

[8] Ginger Root Against Seasickness. A Controlled Trial on the Open Sea

[9] Effects of Ginger on Motion Sickness and Gastric Slow-wave Dysrhythmias Induced by Circular Vection

[10] Pharmacological Basis for the Medicinal Use of Ginger in Gastrointestinal Disorders

[11] Gastroprotective Activity of Essential Oils from Turmeric and Ginger

[12] Protective Mechanisms of 6-gingerol in Dextran Sulfate Sodium-induced Chronic Ulcerative Colitis in Mice

[13] Peppermint Oil (Mintoil) in the Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a Prospective Double Blind Placebo-controlled Randomized Trial

[14] The Impact of Peppermint Oil on the Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a Meta-analysis of the Pooled Clinical Data

[15] Antiemetic Activity of Volatile Oil from Mentha Spicata and Mentha × Piperita in Chemotherapy-induced Nausea and Vomiting

[16] Herbal Remedies for Dyspepsia: Peppermint Seems Effective

[17] Herbal Medicines for Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review

[18] The Effect of Lemon Inhalation Aromatherapy on Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy: A Double-Blinded, Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial

[19] Citrus limon (Lemon) Phenomenon-A Review of the Chemistry, Pharmacological Properties, Applications in the Modern Pharmaceutical, Food, and Cosmetics Industries, and Biotechnological Studies

[20] In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-Candida spp. Activity of Plant-Derived Products

[21] Foeniculum vulgare Mill: A Review of Its Botany, Phytochemistry, Pharmacology, Contemporary Application, and Toxicology

[22] Health Benefits of Fennel, Rosemary Volatile Oils and their Nano-Forms in Dyslipidemic Rat Model

[23] Role of Phenolic Compounds in Peptic Ulcer: an Overview

Marshmallow: A Surprising Ingredient for Detox, the Gut, Respiratory Health & More

Tummy Troubles? The Best Essential Oils for Digestive Problems