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Is Magnesium Your Health MVP? – Episode 126

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In this week's episode...

Antioxidants may get all the headlines, but magnesium may just be your health MVP. Learn more about the benefits of this mineral.

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Empowering you Organically – Season 14 – Episode 126

Title: Is Magnesium Your Health MVP?

Hosts: Jonathan Hunsaker, TeriAnn Trevenen

Description:  Antioxidants may get all the headlines, but magnesium may just be your health MVP. Learn more about the benefits of this mineral.

 

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Did you know that Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the human body?

 

According to the National Institute of Health…

  • Magnesium is a nutrient that the body needs to stay healthy.
  • Magnesium is important for many processes in the body, including regulating muscle and nerve function, blood sugar levels, and blood pressure and making protein, bone, and DNA.

 

Let’s dive a bit deeper into just how important Magnesium is to our health…

  • It acts as a cofactor for more than 300 enzymes, regulating a number of fundamental functions such as muscle contraction, neuromuscular conduction, glycemic control, myocardial contraction, and blood pressure.
  • Magnesium also plays a vital role in energy production, active transmembrane transport for other ions (ATP), synthesis of nuclear materials, and bone development.
  • Important to note – magnesium deficiency has been associated with a wide range of diseases.

 

Magnesium and Nutrition

  • According to the United States Food and Nutrition Board, recommended daily allowance for magnesium is 420 mg for adult males and 320 mg for adult females, respectively.
  • Approximately 10% of the daily magnesium requirement is derived from water.
  • Green vegetables, nuts, seeds, and unprocessed cereals are rich sources of magnesium. Also, some magnesium is available in fruits, fish, meat, and milk products.
  • The majority of the population in the Western countries consume less than the recommended amount of magnesium, contributed by the consumption of processed foods, demineralized water, and agricultural practices using soil deficient in magnesium for growing food.
  • Many studies have demonstrated beneficial effects of magnesium supplementation.

 

Chronic Diseases Associated with Magnesium Deficiency

  • type 2 diabetes & metabolic syndrome
    • Studies suggest that about 48% of people with type 2 diabetes have low levels of magnesium in their blood. This can impair insulin’s ability to keep blood sugar levels under control
    • One study which followed more than 4,000 people for 20 years found that those with the highest magnesium intake were 47% less likely to develop diabetes.
  • hypertension
    • Magnesium helps lower blood pressure in people with elevated levels but does not seem to have the same effect in those with normal levels.
  • cardiovascular disease (e.g., stroke, atherosclerotic vascular disease, sudden cardiac death)
  • osteoporosis
  • migraine headache
  • asthma
  • colon cancer
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

 

Other Areas of Health Where Magnesium Helps

 

May boost exercise performance

  • Magnesium helps move blood sugar into your muscles and dispose of lactate, which can build up during exercise and cause fatigue
  • Studies have shown that supplementing with it can boost exercise performance for athletes, the elderly and people with chronic disease
  • In a study, athletes who supplemented with magnesium for four weeks had faster running, cycling and swimming times during a triathlon. They also experienced reductions in insulin and stress hormone levels
  • Magnesium supplements have been shown to enhance exercise performance in several studies, but research results are mixed.

 

Magnesium Fights Depression

  • Magnesium plays a critical role in brain function and mood, and low levels are linked to an increased risk of depression
  • One analysis in over 8,800 people found that people under the age of 65 with the lowest magnesium intake had a 22% greater risk of depression.
  • Some experts believe the low magnesium content of modern food may cause many cases of depression and mental illness; however, others emphasize the need for more research in this area.
  • Nonetheless, supplementing with this mineral may help reduce symptoms of depression — and in some cases, the results can be dramatic.
  • In a randomized controlled trial in depressed older adults, 450 mg of magnesium daily improved mood as effectively as an antidepressant drug.

 

Anti-Inflammatory Benefits

  • Low magnesium intake is linked to chronic inflammation (elevated C-reactive protein), which is one of the drivers of aging, obesity and chronic disease.
  • Magnesium supplements can reduce CRP and other markers of inflammation in older adults, overweight people and those with prediabetes.
  • In the same way, high-magnesium foods — such as fatty fish and dark chocolate — can reduce inflammation.

 

Magnesium Improves PMS Symptoms

  • Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is one of the most common disorders among women of childbearing age.
  • Its symptoms include water retention, abdominal cramps, tiredness and irritability.
  • Interestingly, magnesium has been shown to improve mood, reduce water retention and other symptoms in women with PMS

 

Magnesium Is Safe and Widely Available

Magnesium is absolutely essential for good health. The recommended daily intake is 400–420 mg per day for men and 310–320 mg per day for women.

 

You can get it from both food and supplements.

 

Food Sources

The following foods are good to excellent sources of magnesium:

 

Pumpkin seeds: 46% of the RDI in a quarter cup (16 grams)

Spinach, boiled: 39% of the RDI in a cup (180 grams)

Swiss chard, boiled: 38% of the RDI in a cup (175 grams)

Dark chocolate (70–85% cocoa): 33% of the RDI in 3.5 ounces (100 grams)

Black beans: 30% of the RDI in a cup (172 grams)

Quinoa, cooked: 33% of the RDI the in a cup (185 grams)

Halibut: 27% of the RDI in 3.5 ounces (100 grams)

Almonds: 25% of the RDI in a quarter cup (24 grams)

Cashews: 25% of the RDI in a quarter cup (30 grams)

Mackerel: 19% of the RDI in 3.5 ounces (100 grams)

Avocado: 15% of the RDI in one medium avocado (200 grams)

Salmon: 9% of the RDI in 3.5 ounces (100 grams)

 

Supplements

If you have a medical condition, check with your doctor before taking magnesium supplements.

 

Though these are generally well-tolerated, they may not be safe for people who take certain diuretics, heart medications or antibiotics.

 

Organixx’s Magnesium 7:

 

MAGNESIUM CHELATE

This form of magnesium is especially important for muscle building, recovery, and health. [17]

 

MAGNESIUM CITRATE

Helps with the effects of obesity. In fact, one study found that this form helped arterial stiffness in healthy overweight individuals.

 

MAGNESIUM BISGLYCINATE

Often used to treat symptoms of excess stomach acid, such as stomach upset, heartburn, and acid indigestion.

 

MAGNESIUM MALATE

Some believe this to be the most bioavailable form of magnesium. It’s found naturally in fruits, giving them a “tart taste.”

 

Magnesium Malate can help with migraines, chronic pain, and depression.

 

MAGNESIUM ASPARTATE

This form helps the connection between your brain and muscles, your cardiac rhythms, and the overall acid-alkaline balance in your body. It also can support an elevated mood.

 

It is absolutely essential in the metabolism of macronutrients, as well as the utilization of other minerals, B-complex vitamins, vitamin C and vitamin E.

 

MAGNESIUM TAURATE

This is the form of magnesium best for your heart.

 

One study noted: “The complex magnesium taurate may thus have considerable potential as a vascular-protective nutritional supplement.”

 

MAGNESIUM OROTATE

While also helpful for the heart, magnesium orotate is believed to be the best form for metabolic improvements.

 

This makes it a favorite for athletes seeking enhanced recovery, energy and performance.

 

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Jonathan Hunsaker:

It is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body. Magnesium has more research benefits than any other nutrient, more studies to back up its claims, and I believe it has thousands of studies to date.

Speaker 1:

Empowering You Organically, delivering content you trust, with results you love.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Welcome everyone to another episode of Empowering You Organically. I’m your host, Jonathan Hunsaker, joined by my co-host, TeriAnn Trevenen.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Hey everyone.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Today, we are talking about a very, very important subject. We’re going to talk about magnesium. And the reason we’re going to talk about it is, did you know that 75% of the US population is deficient in magnesium? Being deficient in magnesium causes a whole plethora of issues in your body, in your psyche. So we really just wanted to dedicate a whole podcast talking about magnesium, talking about how you can get more magnesium in your diet. And we’re also going to talk about and introduce a brand new product of ours called Magnesium 7, that I think you’re going to find fascinating.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

First and foremost, let’s just talk really quickly about magnesium. It is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body. Magnesium has more research benefits than any other nutrient, more studies to back up its claims, and I believe it has thousands of studies to date. Magnesium, this is not just some “I saw a meme on this on Facebook, that we need magnesium.” This is not just somebody making up some things. The science behind magnesium and the importance of magnesium is some of the strongest that’s out there, and it’s why it’s so important to have it in our bodies.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Absolutely. Magnesium is required for over 600 important bodily processes. And even if you’re eating all your leafy green vegetables, raw nuts, and seeds that contain magnesium, which is super important for preventing disease and painful health conditions, even if you’re eating as much of it as you can, between poor soil quality that lacks the minerals that we need in our body, and absorption, not being easily absorbed into the body, you need to supplement with magnesium to get the normal levels of magnesium that your body needs.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

I think that so many people don’t understand how their body works and exactly what they need. We know we need to eat good nutrition, but when we talk about all these things, we’re starting to learn just what our body needs. Our bodies are a machine. And when it comes to magnesium, over 600 important bodily processes- think about that for a minute. Your body’s just going in all these different directions, doing all these different things, all at the same time. 600 different processes for magnesium. And if you’re deficient, think about how those 600 processes in your body are impacted.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Absolutely. Some of the biggest ones if you’re deficient in magnesium, is heart disease, high blood pressure, mood disorders, poor sleep quality, feeling stressed out, lack of energy, low bone mass, sore muscles, foot and leg cramps. The list just goes on and on. Migraines, headaches, slow metabolism, asthma, insulin resistance, all sorts of them.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And I’m not going to focus on necessarily one more than the other, but I will talk about one of the biggest benefits to supplementing with a good magnesium. And I’m not just saying a good magnesium that you normally find on the market, because there aren’t any others compared to what we created, but a magnesium having all different forms of magnesium in your diet, and how important that is.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

But the biggest thing that it’s going to help with is stress and anxiety. And now more than ever, I think that the entire world is under a lot of stress, whether that’s from fears around the pandemic, or fears around the virus, or stress because your town is locked down, or you’re having to stay inside, stress about where’s the next paycheck coming from, where’s the next meal coming from, how am I going to teach my kids? They’re home from school. Now more than ever, if it wasn’t crazy two years ago, which I think the stress levels were already at their peak with the way that we live our lives, now they’re even higher. And what happens is, when you’re stressed out like that, your adrenals get maxed out, and now it’s even harder to just be able to process and manage life.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And one of the best things that you can do is get more magnesium in your diet to be able to manage that stress, to manage that anxiety, and ultimately to help restore your adrenals to healthy levels, which will allow you to, again, just be calmer, be more level-headed, be in a better mood, and be able to really handle life stresses a lot easier.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Absolutely. One of the other things that’s really interesting as we become more aware of the benefits and the impact magnesium has on our body, and the dangers of being deficient in it, is all the different types of magnesium, and exactly what they can do for your body. And sometimes when we’re looking at things that we can supplement with, there’s just one version of that naturally growing ingredient, or that naturally occurring vitamin or nutrient that our body needs. But with magnesium, we have different types of magnesium, and all of them can do different things for your body.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Well, and that’s just that I think most of the time when we think about magnesium, and I grabbed some because I have some in my cabinet, and that’s just grabbing that main one style of magnesium that’s used to calm you down, take a little bit at night. But you’re missing out on all of the other forms of magnesium and all of the other benefits.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And when I tell you there’s nothing else like this on the market, there really isn’t, when it comes to getting the full spectrum of magnesium that your body needs to be able to thrive. Again, you can eat organic, you can eat all the leafy greens, you can do all of that, but our soil quality is just garbage now, especially here in the States. The amount of nutrients that’s in our food has gone down tremendously. There’s just certain things you have to supplement with, and magnesium is one of those things. If you’re not taking some sort of magnesium supplement, and even if you are, you got to make sure that you’re getting enough of it.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And really, what are all of the different types of magnesium? Should we talk about that? Should we talk about all the different types of magnesium, what they do, how they can help you?

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Absolutely. So we’ll talk with magnesium chelate, which is chelated forms of magnesium that provide absorbency in comparison to non-chelated magnesium. Remember, we talked about absorption being an issue with magnesium, right? And so when we’re talking about these, we’re really looking at sources of magnesium that have better absorption and really allow your body to take on that magnesium and to really benefit from it.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Magnesium chelate is amazing for muscle recovery. So if you’re someone who loves to work out, who loves to lift, who loves to run, who loves to keep your body strong and healthy, chances are that you have sore muscles. Sometimes we have sore muscles from our back pain and aches in our body as we age. And magnesium can be something that we can supplement with to really help with muscle recovery. If we strain something, if we’ve injured something, if we’re lifting, maybe if we’re just aching from old age and doing too much, which can happen, magnesium chelate is an amazing thing that we can add in to our supplemental routine to benefit our body with muscle recovery.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Yeah. Magnesium, I think we often compartmentalize, or we just think magnesium is good for this one thing. At least that’s how it was for me. And I know that I would associate magnesium with the leg cramps or with the soreness or things like that. And you hear about magnesium, I do for sure, doing a lot of weight training. And it’s just amazing that as we dove deeper into this subject, how many other forms of magnesium there are and all of the other benefits. So do you want to talk about the next one that we have?

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Yeah. Before we go onto that, something that I want to point out, you’re going to hear us talk a lot about stress today when it comes to magnesium. And just going back to muscle recovery for a second, when our muscles need help with recovery, they’re hurting, they’re aching, maybe we’ve injured something, it’s interesting to think about how magnesium is really critical for stressors when it comes to our health and our body. Muscle recovery is a form of stress that’s happened to your body and you’re helping it to recover. And I think this is a theme you’re going to hear as we talk more and more about magnesium, but I wanted to point that out. Muscle recovery comes from stress to the muscles, and magnesium can help with that stress and recovery, to get your muscles back to optimal function.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

So the next form of magnesium is magnesium glycinate. And this is something that you can supplement with when it comes to sleep and anxiety and brain health. It can help support better sleep for your body, and it can also support your anxiety levels. That’s something I think a lot of us are dealing with right now in the world, is stress and anxiety. Think about that for a minute, too. It benefits you when it comes to healthier sleep, but it’s also reducing those stress levels in your body, and it helps you to come down off of that stress. It can really support your body in healthy stress management.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

And one other thing that comes with magnesium glycinate is brain health. Brain health is something that is becoming more and more talked about and discussed as we see the rise of Alzheimer’s and dementia. Being deficient in magnesium can actually be one of the things that can lead to poor brain health. This is something I’ve been studying more and more about recently, conversations I’ve been having with people about brain health and how we come to have poor brain health. But this is a part of our body. This is a part of our health. This is a part of the entire function of how we manage our body every single day. Brain health is so, so, so important to our overall health. Magnesium glycinate is something that you can take to support better brain health, which I think is so important.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Yeah. And you may also see it listed as diglycinate as well. So magnesium glycinate, magnesium diglycinate, it’s the same thing, so don’t worry if you’re seeing it listed two different ways.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

But this is the number one form of magnesium for anxiety. There’s studies that show that this calms anxiety. So the magnesium glycinate diglycinate, absolutely if you’re looking for stress relief, if you’re looking for anxiety relief, this is by far the best one.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And I will also suggest, and I’ll talk about this more a little bit later, but taking it on an empty stomach, especially before an event or something that may have you a little bit more anxious, a little bit more nervous, you will find will ultimately calm you down in about 30 minutes’ time. But this is the form of magnesium that is phenomenal for anxiety, and has all the studies to back it up.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Absolutely. The next one we’re going to talk about is magnesium aspartate. It is a form of magnesium that is bonded to aspartic acid, a non-essential amino acid found in protein-rich foods such as egg and meat. Often we talk about the supplements you’re supposed to take. These are actually naturally occurring things that happen in food we eat every day. But we may not be getting enough of it. We know we’re not getting enough of it.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Aspartic acid is often used by bodybuilders to enhance athletic performance, recovery and muscle strength. However, magnesium aspartate is actually proven to support better mood, help with anxiety and depression. Here we have again another form of magnesium that can really help boost those emotional levels, to have you in a better happier, healthier state emotionally.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Yeah. And the bioavailability of magnesium aspartate is higher than other forms of magnesium as well. It’s why it’s used in a lot of studies. Again, this is the big misconception out there, is that, oh, if I just take a magnesium supplement, that I’ll be fine. But if you’re not getting all the different forms of magnesium in your magnesium supplement, you’re missing out on all of the different benefits that you can have.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And again, that magnesium aspartate, it’s great for the mood, anxiety, depression, muscle recovery. We’re going to sound like broken records here, but these different forms of magnesium touch different parts of our body. And like we talked about earlier in the podcast, it affects 600 different functions in our body. So when you hear it, you’re like, oh, well I thought that other magnesium was good for this. Yes, it’s going to affect different places.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

The top three, really, in my opinion, that magnesium and getting the full spectrum magnesium is going to affect, is stress, anxiety and sleep. So if any one of those are a big issue for you, this is what you need to be paying the most attention to.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Absolutely. Our next one is magnesium malate, and I want to stay on this one for a second, because there’s a couple of different things around this one that I think are really important.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Magnesium malate is a combination of essential magnesium and malic acid, an organic substance made by all living things. I found this really interesting. Malic acid is what gives fruit, such as green apples, cranberries and citrus their tart taste. So if you’re wondering where that comes from, you’re like “how does magnesium play into what I’m eating every day?” there’s one way you can really see it in your daily nutrition.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

It is considered one of the most bioavailable forms of magnesium. We’re just hitting this nail on the head over and over and over again. But magnesium malate is able to remain active in the blood serum longer than other forms of magnesium.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

There’s two sides to malate that I think are really important to touch on. The first is it supports and improves ATP at a cellular level, which improves energy and helps reduce pain. I don’t know about you, but I could always use more energy in my life. I want to feel like a little kid again and have more energy.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

But also, magnesium malate is probably most important for brain and nervous health. Because it’s able to work quickly and is more long lasting, magnesium malate is considered one of the most beneficial forms for brain and nervous system health, and one of the best magnesium supplements for headache, including migraine. So if that’s something that you’re experiencing, this would be a great thing to supplement with to try and diminish those headaches that you may be having.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Absolutely. Some of the “side effects” is it’s also going to help with depression, sleep, chronic pain, fatigue.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And it’s interesting when we talk about fatigue, we talk about how magnesium really helps our body, and it also helps with the adrenals. Have you ever noticed that at some point, if you started drinking coffee or if you’ve had too much coffee or you’re a high consumer of coffee or caffeine, you actually start getting to the point where it almost gets jittery, almost where you may not even be able to have coffee on a daily basis? That’s because your adrenals, your body’s fatigued, things are out of balance.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Interestingly enough, getting your body back in balance and getting all of these different forms of magnesium can allow you to consume caffeine again at a healthy level and get the mental benefits from caffeine and not get that adrenal fatigue, that stressed out, that freaked out, that “I can’t do all of this.” Now I’m not out here saying, “Hey, go drink a bunch of Red Bulls and drink a lot of caffeine.” But I am saying that the overstressed society that we live in and our adrenals being blown out and all of these different things, can all be repaired, I’ll say, with these different forms of magnesium in your diet.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

I just want to point out that I love that you said the “side effects” of taking magnesium. Mainstream medicine, the side effects are all these negative things. But I loved that spin on the side effects of good nutrition, happy side effects, not bad side effects. I just was stuck on that after you said that. I don’t think I heard anything you said after that because I was going down this rabbit hole of “that’s great, I love that.”

TeriAnn Trevenen:

All right, our next magnesium is magnesium orotate. It is a type of magnesium salt that comes from orotic acid and is easily absorbed into the cells. Again, we’re back on this absorption conversation. Absorption is so important. Some studies around magnesium orotate prove that it’s especially beneficial for the heart and exercise performance. Heart health, critical for all of us. And this is something that can really benefit your heart health. But if you’re someone who works out, who is someone who’s doing weightlifting, running, training, any type of sport, this can really help you with your exercise performance.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

It really helps with your cardiovascular side of it as well. And that’s important. And we have a study here. It says another study published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy reported that steady supplementation with magnesium orotate helped improve function in ventricular function, as well as exercise tolerance, specifically in patients with coronary heart disease. I listed the top three things, but if I got to add a fourth one, it’s the heart health that magnesium really helps with. And we see this over and over again. We’re about to see it on the next one, but whether that’s dealing with high blood pressure, cardiovascular health, heart health overall, magnesium is- I’m going to refer back to it as a magic pill. Because when I started taking it several months ago and we were testing different things out, I saw phenomenal results in my life, and our different team members that started taking it and trying it out, it’s amazing what getting all the different forms of magnesium will do for you.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Absolutely. Our next magnesium is magnesium taurate. It is one of the best forms of magnesium for easy assimilation into the body. There we go again, absorption so important. It is used by the body naturally to transport magnesium ions in and out of cells. So this is a magnesium carrier, if you will, that really helps get magnesium to where it needs to go.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

And this is something that really helps with high blood pressure, relaxation, and calming the nerves. I said it earlier in the podcast, but I think we could all use a little more in our lives right now after the last year that we have all been through. So I think that taking a magnesium if you’re feeling a lot of stress, there are multiple versions of magnesium that we’ve talked about today that can really improve your emotional health and your stress levels. And again, I think that’s something that all of us can benefit from right now.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Yeah. The studies that are out here for this are phenomenal. There’s studies that talk about how it can help with high blood pressure. Other studies have found that magnesium taurate can improve heart palpitations and lessen anxiety attacks. It also has the ability to stabilize cell membranes. It can easily pass through the blood-brain barrier for enhanced brain health.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

This is why you need all the different forms of magnesium, to touch on all of these different areas. I just loved when we started going down this rabbit hole, the more information that we found out and the more areas in all of these places that you can’t find out on the market, all of these different kinds of magnesiums and all the different ways they can affect your body.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Absolutely. Our last magnesium is magnesium citrate. It’s a magnesium that’s combined with citric acid. It’s one of the most popular types of magnesium on the market today. And here we go again, according to the National Institute of Health it’s one of the most highly absorbable forms of magnesium in the body.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Now here’s the unique thing about magnesium citrate that I don’t think we’ve touched on today yet. Like all forms of magnesium, it’s vital for heart health, muscles, and bone health, so we have talked about that, but it’s also required for RNA and DNA synthesis, and for the production of glutathione, which is the master antioxidant. Antioxidants are so important in getting toxins and garbage out of our body and allowing our body to be as healthy as it possibly can, by getting rid of those toxins that can bombard our immune system and keep us from being as healthy as we possibly can.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Yeah. And the interesting part with magnesium citrate, it’s great for intestinal health. So if you’re having issues with constipation, trouble going, then this can absolutely help get your intestines and your bowel movements back in balance.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And it’s interesting, because I’m going to jump ahead a little bit, because we’ve gone through the seven different forms of magnesium and yes, all seven of these are in our new Magnesium 7 supplement, hence the name, but one question that’s going to come up is how do I take Magnesium 7? How much of it should I take? And the reason I’m going to touch on this is because it has to do with magnesium citrate and how it affects your intestines and your bowel movements, is the standard dose is going to be two capsules a day.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

But a lot of us are very deficient. And so one of the ways to find out how much you need to get back in balance, and I’ll tell you, this is what I do. There’s no diagnosis, I’m not prescribing anything, I’m not giving any medical advice. This is just what I do, and what I found works for me, and for many others. I personally take two at night before bed, about 30 minutes beforehand. That helps me get a good night’s rest. I wake up in the morning and I take one in the morning. And then usually mid day on an empty stomach, I take another one.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Now, one of the interesting things with magnesium is you can find out when you’ve taken too much, because you will be hurrying along to the bathroom and it will help clean you out. Not that it’s a bad thing, not that it’s hurting you, but that can help you get your balance.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

If you’re trying to figure out how much do I take, you can start just a recommended dose and take one in the morning and one in the evening, be fine. But if you want to get fully optimum, then take some more. I do. I do two at night, one in the morning, one in the afternoon, works for me. When I first started off and I was doing two at night and I’d do two in the morning. I found myself running to the bathroom. If I did too much, that’s how I really knew how to find my balance. And that just shows you the efficacy of having a supplement like this, especially if it’s there to help with constipation and help clean out your bowels.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Now let’s talk about just the last thing, that’s also in Magnesium 7. Well, there’s two other things, but the one that I’m really going to talk about is we’ve also added vitamin B6 to the magnesium. Here’s why. Studies show that when you combine vitamin B6 with magnesium, it increases the stress reduction by 24%. So think about this. This is really a stress pill. This is an anxiety pill. This is a sleep better pill. This is also a muscle recovery pill. If we can increase a lot of those effects by 24%, why wouldn’t we? And so that’s another level that we get to here at Organixx, by doing blends and combining things that complement each other and make things more effective and increase the efficacy, rather than just giving you the bare minimum, like one magnesium, or even stopping to just seven magnesiums. Instead, we actually go a step further because we know that if we add B6 as well, then you’re going to get 24% more efficacy for stress reduction.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Absolutely. And the other interesting thing too about vitamin B6. We talked about how magnesium impacts you over 600 functions in the body. Well, vitamin B6, not only, as Jonathan mentioned, helps you to take on more of that magnesium into your cells – that’s one of the reasons that it’s paired together – but vitamin B6 is also essential for over 100 enzyme reactions that are happening with your body in relation to metabolism. We all know that we don’t get enough enzymes in our bodies with our current nutrition and the way we eat. Enzymes are what help us to break so many things down in our body and get them to the right places and make sure our body’s working and functioning properly. So here we have magnesium that’s impacting 600 different functions in the body. We have vitamin B6 that’s impacting over 100 enzyme reactions in the body. And here it is helping magnesium to be either more easily absorbed into the body. It’s why it’s so important to have this in the magnesium product.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Absolutely. There’s so much more that we could cover on here. And what I’m going to do is I’m going to suggest that you go check out the show notes, go check out the website. We have all of the research cited there. So go to empoweringyouorganically.com. Check out the show notes, check out the resources section, do your own study, do your own research. And I believe you’ll find the same conclusions that we did, that your body needs all of these different forms of magnesium.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

And then if you feel inspired, and I encourage you, try out our new Magnesium 7. If you’re actually listening to this within the first few days of this airing live, we’re doing a 20% off discount, just as a introductory offer to get this out to the market. So hopefully you’re listening to this within that timeframe. You can go to organics.com and take advantage of that discount.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Listen, as with everything, we back all of our supplements with a 365 day money back guarantee. So you can get one bottle, three bottles, six bottles, 12 bottles. And if it’s not working for you, just send us back, even if all the bottles are empty, and we’ll refund all your money. So it’s the only way that I know how to convince you that these are the best supplements on the market. And Magnesium 7 may be the best one that we’ve ever put out. I honestly feel like this is a magic pill, especially in this day and age with the stress levels that are going on and just the anxiety that people are feeling. And I know what it’s done for me. I know what it’s done for other team members. I think that you will find this to be a phenomenal addition to your daily diet.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Awesome.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Do you have anything else?

TeriAnn Trevenen:

I think we’re good. I think we’ve covered a lot of information today.

Jonathan Hunsaker:

Thank you so much. Empoweringyouorganically.com to get all the show notes. Make sure you Like us. Give us a thumbs up on iTunes, on YouTube, wherever you’re watching this. And we will see you on the next show. Thanks for watching.

TeriAnn Trevenen:

Thanks, everyone.

 

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Magnesium and Human Health: Perspectives and Research Directions Volume 2018 |Article ID 9041694

J. Bertinato, C. Wu Xiao, W. M. Ratnayake et al., “Lower serum magnesium concentration is associated with diabetes, insulin resistance, and obesity in South Asian and white Canadian women but not men,” Food & Nutrition Research, vol. 59, no. 1, article 25974, 2015.

U. Grober, J. Schmidt, and K. Kisters, “Magnesium in prevention and therapy,” Nutrients, vol. 7, no. 9, pp. 8199–8226, 2015.

J. H. F. de Baaij, J. G. J. Hoenderop, and R. J. M. Bindels, “Magnesium in man: implications for health and disease,” Physiological Reviews, vol. 95, no. 1, pp. 1–46, 2015.

Reported Dietary Intake, Disparity between the Reported Consumption and the Level Needed for Adequacy and Food Sources of Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium and Vitamin D in the Spanish Population: Findings from the ANIBES Study

Suboptimal magnesium status in the United States: are the health consequences underestimated?

Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy

Effect of oral magnesium supplementation on physical performance in healthy elderly women involved in a weekly exercise program: a randomized controlled trial

Oral magnesium therapy, exercise heart rate, exercise tolerance, and myocardial function in coronary artery disease patients

The effect of acute magnesium loading on the maximal exercise performance of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

Magnesium enhances exercise performance via increasing glucose availability in the blood, muscle, and brain during exercise

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Rapid recovery from major depression using magnesium treatment

Efficacy and safety of oral magnesium supplementation in the treatment of depression in the elderly with type 2 diabetes: a randomized, equivalent trial

Oral magnesium supplementation reduces ambulatory blood pressure in patients with mild hypertension

Effects of magnesium supplementation in hypertensive patients: assessment by office, home, and ambulatory blood pressures

A pilot study on the effects of magnesium supplementation with high and low habitual dietary magnesium intake on resting and recovery from aerobic and resistance exercise and systolic blood pressure

The effect of lowering blood pressure by magnesium supplementation in diabetic hypertensive adults with low serum magnesium levels: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

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Effects of magnesium citrate, magnesium oxide and magnesium sulfate supplementation on arterial stiffness in healthy overweight individuals: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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Complementary vascular-protective actions of magnesium and taurine: a rationale for magnesium taurate

Metabolic supplementation with orotic acid and magnesium orotate

Magnesium enhances exercise performance via increasing glucose availability in the blood, muscle, and brain during exercise

Effect of oral magnesium supplementation on physical performance in healthy elderly women involved in a weekly exercise program: a randomized controlled trial